Image by Rene Baker

FemXX’s LGBTQIA+
Endo Resource Hub

Did you know that endometriosis in the LGBTQIA+ community is severely underdiagnosed? This Pride, we seek to spread awareness on the medical neglect that gender-diverse people face. Below are some fact and resources for LGBTQIA+ Endo-Fighters, and what can be done to lessen the stigma.

Image by Angela Compagnone

01

Endometriosis is not just a cis-women’s issue

Endometriosis can occur in any individual that has or had a uterus, regardless of their gender identity.

02

Endometriosis in LGBTQ+ individuals is diagnosed less often than it is in cis-women

It has been measured that endometriosis affects 1 in 10 women. However, the extent to which it affects trans, non-binary, intersex and gender-diverse people remains unmeasured due to medical ignorance

Image by Alex Jackman
Image by Sharon McCutcheon

03

Gendered language around endometriosis can worsen patients’ gender dysphoria

Many LGBTQ+ individuals are forced to use their given names/pronouns when consulting doctors on endometriosis, owing to ignorance around gender identity. This burdens LGBTQ+ individuals to hide or constantly explain their identity, which can be a dysphoric experience

04

The effects of Endo aren't just related to pregnancy and menstruation

Endometriosis was historically seen as an issue that mostly affected pregnancy and menstruation. However, Endo affects the digestive system, the musculoskeletal system, different organs, and even one’s mood. It's a whole-body condition that is also experienced by persons that do not wish to conceive or menstruate

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Image by Michał Parzuchowski

05

Info is scarce about the effects of endo treatments in transgender individuals

Medical professionals often lack information on how gender-affirming treatments such as testosterone or estrogen interact with Endo treatments, given that this intersection is deeply under researched.

5 things you should know about endo in LGBTQ+ individuals

Watch this: Living with Endo as a transgender man

Image by Sharon McCutcheon

FemXX Health is an inclusive and patient-centric organization dedicated to improving the experiences and treatment of all people with endometriosis: cis-women, transgender, nonbinary, and gender-diverse people. For this reason, we use inclusive terms like patients, Endo-fighters, community members, or use the term ‘womxn’, which is inclusive of transgender, non-binary and genderqueer persons.

Support LGBTQIA+ Endo-fighters!

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LGBTQIA+ Research & Articles:

Treating Endometriosis as a Women's Disease Hurts Patients of All Genders
Living with endo is already hard when you're a white cis woman. For LGBTQ people dealing with a "women's disease," it's especially painful. Read More

Endometriosis Impacts Lesbian and F to M Pregnancy

Endometriosis impacts female reproductive organs and can be an obstacle for lesbian and F to M gender queer pregnancy. Read More

Ich bin queer, habe Behinderungen, und hier ist mein Rat für dein Studium

Wenn du noch zur Schule gehst, solltest du eins nicht vergessen: Du bist nicht allein. Read More

Queering gendered disabilities

This project defines gendered disabilities broadly, including chronic illnesses that involve the uterus, ovaries, and other body parts traditionally classified as “female.” Read More

Understanding the Health Needs of LGBT People

Although social acceptance of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people in the United States has been improving, LGBT individuals continue to face stigma and discrimination. Read more

Endometriosis and Gender Nonconformity

It's problematic to attach gender to any disease (read: breast cancer, eating disorders, heart disease, etc.). Diseases aren't privy to the complexities of gender and race. Read more

Being diagnosed with endometriosis showed me that uterus healthcare is a queer issue'

One writer reflects on where we are – and what needs to change. Read more

Why LGBTQ2S+ endometriosis support groups are key to better care

When trans and queer folks with endo need information that their doctors are not able to provide, these groups empower them to advocate for better care. Read more